Massages – Precautions

Before exploring the positive effects of massage, it is important to know when massages are inappropriate or harmful.  Anyone with a chronic or serious health condition should consult a medical doctor and a certified massage therapist before receiving professional or amateur massage.

Massages Not Recommended

  • Heart ailments can be aggravated by an overly vigorous massage.
  • Low blood pressure can be lowered more when neural neck points are stroked. Migraine headaches may be intensified when massage is given after the prodrome phase (the warning stage), although massage given before or during the prodrome can prevent a migraine episode.
  • Skin problems might be aggravated by friction or oil (acne, for example) and some conditions are contagious,
  • Painful joints may be adversely affected by massage, If caused by certain diseases.
  • Some cancers may spread to other regions. if massage is given.  Since massage improves circulation. medications can travel through the body more quickly after massage.
  • Diabetics must inform whoever massages them of that days insulin injection site to prevent a too fast distribution of the drug.
  • Certain other medications arc meant to be released on a timetable that massage or other activities may disrupt.
  • 1f you have a bad cold, a massage can make you much worse, as it can flush the lymphatic system and force more pathogens into the bloodstream
  • Not advised in varicose veins or deep vein thrombosis.  Many therapists are taught to massage in the direction of the circulation and toward the heart, so its unwise to apply pressure to an existing faulty system.

Communication During Massages

But the key to trouble-free massages is communication. Patients need to be up-front about their history with massage, bothersome conditions (bad back, sore neck, acute stress), and any Illnesses or health concerns.

“A lot of times the patient says they don’t want to complain, but we tell them it’s riot a complaint. it’s just reporting,” says Karen Gilbert, director of Cancer treatment Centers of America at Tulsa’s Oncology Rehabilitation Department The mote information you give me and the more involved you are, the more benefit you’ll gain.

Educate Doctor About Massages

Unfortunately, many medical doctors are ignorant of both the pros and cons of massage. A certified massage therapist should be consulted, along with a physician. In fact, consider having the therapist accompany you to your doctor’s appointment.

She or he can explain what massage style might be best and educate the M.D. further. The massage therapist should be thoroughly familiar with massage contraindications and have pathology training.

Graduates from American Massage Therapy Association-approved schools have spent at least 1000 hours in massage educetion and, most likely, know if massage is appropriate in your circumstances.

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